Vote for Event Espresso

Vote for Event Espresso

Event Espresso has been nominated for the prestigious “2010 Plugin of the Year Award” at WordPress Honors. Please take a few minutes to show your support for Event Espresso (and any of  your other favorite plugins,) by voting.

Need a little more incentive? Each person that registers on the WordPress Honors website will be entered to win great prizes from other great WordPress theme and plugin developers.

So hurry up and cast your vote for Event Espresso and start winning prizes! :)

Beware of “pirated” premium plugins and themes that may add malicious scripts and open back doors into your server and/or your WordPress installations.

Apparently several people have had the misfortune of downloading a pirated version of my Advanced Events Registration plugin from some file sharing websites. One person’s site was entirely overwritten with spam posts and links pirated software. While another persons entire website was completely wiped out.

The website owner (whom I wont mention here) actually threatened to sue me because five years worth of content was completely removed from their blog. When I asked for a copy of their receipt from the purchase of the premium plugin. The person stated they had downloaded it from a free file hosting website. Can you believe it! So I stated the obvious, “You didn’t purchase the plugin from my website, so you will need to contact whomever you received the files from. I am not responsible for code that may be distributed by outside sources.”

Moral of the story:

Premium plugins and themes may be GPL licensed (or not in some cases.) Unless you get them from a trusted source, you may be taking a major risk using them.

Related information:

How Downloading a Premium Theme/Plugin From the Wrong Place Can Ruin Your Site

Downloading a Premium Theme from the Wrong Site can be Expensive

Download Free Premium WordPress theme :What’s the Catch?

WordPress Premium Developer and Author Piracy My Thoughts

The Ethics of WordPress Themes at a Premium

Here is a very useful function I have written to install/update the database tables in your custom WordPress plugin. Basically I have used the examples given on the “Creating Tables with Plugins” page at WordPress.org.

In your main plugin file (ex. my_plugin.php) I define my plugin version:

define("MY_PLUGIN_VERSION", "2.16" ); //Declare the plugin version. This way we know the tables are always up to date. I usually declare this in my main plugin file.
require_once("includes/functions.php");
require_once("includes/database_install.php");
register_activation_hook(__FILE__,'my_plugin_data_tables_install');

Then in my functions.php file:

function my_plugin_run_install ($table_name, $table_version, $sql) {
		   global $wpdb;
		   $wp_table_name = $wpdb->prefix . $table_name;
		   if($wpdb->get_var("SHOW TABLES LIKE '".$table_name."'") != $table_name) {
				$sql_create_table = "CREATE TABLE " . $wp_table_name . " ( " . $sql . " ) ;";
				require_once(ABSPATH . 'wp-admin/includes/upgrade.php');
				dbDelta($sql_create_table);
 
			//create option for table version
				$option_name = $table_name.'_tbl_version';
				$newvalue = $table_version;
				  if ( get_option($option_name) ) {
					    update_option($option_name, $newvalue);
					  } else {
					    $deprecated=' ';
					    $autoload='no';
					    add_option($option_name, $newvalue, $deprecated, $autoload);
				  }
			//create option for table name
				$option_name = $table_name.'_tbl';
				$newvalue = $wp_table_name;
				  if ( get_option($option_name) ) {
					    update_option($option_name, $newvalue);
					  } else {
					    $deprecated=' ';
					    $autoload='no';
					    add_option($option_name, $newvalue, $deprecated, $autoload);
				  }
		}
 
	// Code here with new database upgrade info/table Must change version number to work.
	$installed_ver = get_option( $table_name.'_tbl_version' );
	     if( $installed_ver != $table_version ) {
		  $sql_create_table = "CREATE TABLE " . $wp_table_name . " ( " . $sql . " ) ;";
	      require_once(ABSPATH . 'wp-admin/includes/upgrade.php');
	      dbDelta($sql_create_table);
	      update_option( $table_name.'_tbl_version', $table_version );
	      }
	    }

Using the function is quite simple and can save a few lines of code. especially if you need to install several new tables.

Here is an example of database_install.php:

function my_plugin_data_tables_install () {
$table_version = MY_PLUGIN_VERSION; //Call the plugin version.
//Install the first table
$table_name = "my_first_plugin_tbl";
$sql = "id mediumint(9) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
	  time bigint(11) DEFAULT '0' NOT NULL,
	  name tinytext NOT NULL,
	  text text NOT NULL,
	  url VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL,
	  UNIQUE KEY id (id)";
my_plugin_run_install  ($table_name, $table_version, $sql);
 
//Install the second table
$table_name = "my_second_plugin_tbl";
$sql = "id mediumint(9) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
	   category_name VARCHAR(100) DEFAULT NULL,
	   category_identifier VARCHAR(45) DEFAULT NULL,
	   category_desc TEXT,
	   display_desc VARCHAR (4) DEFAULT NULL,
	  UNIQUE KEY id (id)";
my_plugin_run_install  ($table_name, $table_version, $sql);
}

I hope this helps some of the WordPress plugin authors out there.